Third Annual Digital Governance Forum

Framing Innovation: Westminster 2.0 in the Digital Age
May 30-31, 2017

DGF17 Presentations:

Adobe_PDF_file_icon_24x24 Kate Darling – Ottawa lessons from HRI talk

Adobe_PDF_file_icon_24x24 Neil Bouwer – Policymaking

Adobe_PDF_file_icon_24x24 Paul Chapman – A Government that Delivers its Promises

SummaryAgendaVenueSpeakers

Third Annual Digital Governance Forum

FRAMING INNOVATION: WESTMINSTER 2.0 IN A DIGITAL ERA

Today, fast-moving and evolving trends in digital technologies are leading to a radical change in citizen expectations. Citizens are changing their approach to interacting with, and relating to, governmental organizations and services. The nature of these evolving interactions is horizontal, empowering and spontaneous. In many ways, the exact opposite of the traditional hierarchical, bureaucratic and rules-based systems government developed over the decades.

The third annual Digital Governance Forum will focus on “Framing Innovation: Westminster 2.0 in the Digital Age” exploring how public institutions can evolve the Westminster system, both its political and administrative institutions, in a context of increased public expectations for speed, responsiveness and representativeness, a renewed demand for improved outcomes that preserve and advance the public good, and a recognized need to support innovation in our public institutions and beyond.

May 30, 2017

Day 1

8:00 Breakfast & Networking
9:00 Welcome & Opening Remarks
9:30 Keynote Address

Ian McCowan, Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet (Governance), Privy Council Office

“Canada’s Westminster System in a Digital Age”

10:15 Health Break
10:30 (Theme: Democratic Institutions)
Westminster 2.0: Citizenship and Legitimacy in a Digital Age

The Westminster system of parliamentary government is widely credited with the capacity to adapt well to social and cultural evolution. Yet the reality is that, in recent years, governments the world over have struggled to keep up with the rapid pace of change – especially change associated with the rise of digital culture and technology.

The digital age is giving rise to new conceptions of power and democratic governance in which horizontality and citizen-focused design are key. But Westminster was not designed with the digital era in mind and its institutions are under pressure. The legitimacy of governing institutions teeters ever closer to the precipice and the very concepts of authority and accountability require re-examination.

Speaker(s)

  • Brian Topp, Fellow, Public Policy Forum & Partner, KTG Public Affairs
  • Tim Powers, Vice Chairman, Summa Strategies
  • Nadine Smith, Global Director, Centre for Public Impact

Moderator

  • Althia Raj, Ottawa Bureau Chief, Huffington Post
11:45 Lunch & Networking
12:45 (Theme: Public Service)
Building Trust: Mobilizing Capacity to Innovate Across & Outside Government

Governments, while quick to prioritize innovation as a policy imperative, have tended to adopt new digital technologies at a less rapid pace than the private sector and the general public. Workplace innovations enabled by digital technology, such as cloud computing, smartphones, and social networks, have generally not been adopted as quickly due to concerns about privacy and security.

The complex needs and challenges that citizens face every day need new solutions and they need them fast. The opportunities for innovation are abundant, but modern-day government is not known for fostering creativity and will need to adapt to develop the capacity for innovation amidst a political context of high public scrutiny, limited available resources, and compliance barriers where there is little room for error, risk or failure.

Speaker(s)

  • Alex Benay, Chief Information Officer for the Government of Canada, Treasury Board Secretariat
  • Christopher Emery, Vice President, Digital Channels, Rogers Communications Inc.
  • Victoria Lennox, Co-founder & CEO, Startup Canada

Moderator

  • Michele Lajeunesse, Vice President, Digital Governance, Institute on Governance
2:15 Setting the Global Context for Artificial Intelligence

  • Dr. Kate Darling, Research Specialist, MIT Media Lab & Fellow, Harvard Berkman Center
2:30 Health Break
2:45 (Theme: Policy)
Data Analytics, Artificial Intelligence & The Next Frontier in Policy Making

The landscape in which policy professionals operate is changing, as new innovations expand the capabilities of individual policymakers to design and implement policies based on hard evidence, as well as to measure the outcomes of those policies. The increasing sophistication of analytic technologies designed to mine enormous amounts of data for correlations and insights means that truly evidence-based policy, focused on measurable outcomes, is within the reach of every innovative public servant.

Machine learning, cognitive analytics, and natural language processing become more sophisticated every day, and policy professionals will be forced to grapple with the social and economic impacts of automation and cognitive technology in their highest deliberations for the public good, as well as figuring out how to use them to innovate the policy process, enhancing their own work and day-to-day operations.

Speaker(s)

  • Adrian Brown, Executive Director, Centre for Public Impact
  • Dr. Kate Darling, Research Specialist, MIT Media Lab & Fellow, Harvard Berkman Center
  • Erin Kelly, President & CEO, Advanced Symbolics Inc.

Moderator

  • Jeremy Depow, Vice President, Policy & Research, Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC)
4:00 Keynote Address

  • Don Tapscott, CEO, The Tapscott Group

“The Second Era of the Internet: Could Canada Lead? And How?”

5:00 Networking Reception

Day 2 – May 31

8:00 Breakfast & Networking
9:00 Welcome & Opening Remarks
9:30 (Theme: Regulation)
Cyber-Security and Privacy: Striking the Balance

Balancing the need for effective cyber security with the inherent human right to privacy is one of the most delicate and complex tasks facing governments in the digital age. As more and more government functions move online, from day-to-day transactions with citizens to complex policy deliberations, vulnerabilities to hacking by malicious actors becomes an ever-present daily reality. Electronic information systems are intrinsically vulnerable, and government security practices are often inconsistent and ineffective, incapable of moving at the speed of those who would subvert them.

At the same time, as personal data becomes a new form of currency, with many consumer-facing digital services collecting and storing users’ details in lieu of collecting payment, government has an increasingly complex role to play in safeguarding the basic right of the citizen to privacy while allowing the digital economy to operate unhindered.In an increasingly digital world, can the two – cyber security and privacy – be balanced? And, frankly, should they be?

Speaker(s)

  • Luk Arbuckle, Director, Technology Analysis, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada
  • Stuart Beare, Lieutenant-General (retired), Strategic Advisor Public Safety and Defence, Accenture Canada
  • Bonnie Butlin, Co-founder, Security Partners’ Forum

Moderator

  • Andrew House, Principal, The Earnscliffe Strategy Group
10:45 Health Break
11:00 Keynote Address

  • Paul Chapman, Senior Fellow, Said Business School, University of Oxford

“How do we create a Government that delivers its promises?”

11:45 Lunch & Networking
12:45 Theme: Service Delivery)
Service Delivery and the Legitimacy of Government: Raising the Bar

Improving public service efficiency is the name of the game, and is crucial to preserving and protecting the legitimacy of government in the eyes of its citizens. Innovation in digital service delivery has the potential to reap benefit both for governments and the citizens they serve. Digital tools are enabling unprecedented flexibility and convenience in private service delivery, but governments have largely lagged behind in catching up to service provision that consumers and private firms take for granted.

Nonetheless, the journey away from the old way of doing things and towards online, integrated, seamless digital offerings is underway, and is encouraging a new kind of relationship between citizens and the state, as well as between different branches of the state itself. Digitally-inspired innovation presents an opportunity to stop tinkering at the margins and fundamentally redesign how government operates, that is, to rethink what the public sector does, how it does it and, ultimately, how governments interact and engage with citizens.

Speaker(s)

  • Paul Chapman, Senior Fellow, Said Business School, University of Oxford
  • Kathy Conrad, Director, Digital Government, Accenture
  • Jacques Paquette, Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Service & Policy Branch, Employment and Social Development Canada

Moderator

  • Rodney MacDonald, Senior Manager, Global Public Policy, Intuit

 

2:15 Health Break
2:30  (Theme: Future)
Taking Measure of What Citizens Want: Innovation and Leadership

The role of leadership in a democratic society is under unprecedented scrutiny. Direct communication between politicians and the public enabled by digital technology is proving both a democratizer of the communications process and an unprecedented tool for demagoguery and hate speech. Canadian democracy will be under unprecedented pressure to deliver results in the face of alarming demographic, economic, and cultural trends.

In order to deliver the change Canadians desire effectively, governments need to innovate to develop new ways of measuring and evaluating what they do and what citizens want. Innovative social and environmental measures and policies that exceed traditional conceptions of the government’s role will be needed to avert negative outcomes. Politically active and growing First Nations populations will make reconciliation between and justice for both indigenous and non-indigenous Canadians an increasingly urgent national priority. Governments need to be able to measure, demonstrate and evaluate multi-dimensional progress.

Speaker(s)

  • Anil Arora, Chief Statistician of Canada, Statistics Canada
  • Neil Bouwer, Assistant Secretary, Horizontal Innovation Review, Treasury Board Secretariat
  • Alexandra Conliffe, Director, Policy Innovation Platform, Brookfield Institute for Innovation & Entrepreneurship
  • Maryantonett Flumian, President, Institute on Governance
 4:00  Closing Remarks

Adobe Conference Center

343 Preston Street

Ottawa, Ontario

Directions & Parking

Getting to the Adobe Building, 343 Preston Street By Driving Driving

Information Driving Directions: https://www.adobe.com/aboutadobe/contact/ottawa_directions.pdf

Carpool, Taxi or Uber Drop-Off Location: For taxi, Uber or car pool passengers or participants with mobility challenges, there is a drop off location in front of the main entrance to 343 Preston Street and a ramp to the right of the main entrance.

Car Parking: Public Underground Parking Garage beside 343 Preston
Daily rate: $15

City of Ottawa Paid Parking at 301 Preston Street

For further parking information, consult Parkopedia: http://en.parkopedia.ca/parking/ottawa

Keynotes

Ian McCowan

Deputy Secretary of the Cabinet (Governance), Privy Council Office
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Paul Chapman

Senior Fellow, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford
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Don Tapscott

CEO, The Tapscott Group
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Speakers

Luk Arbuckle

Director of Technology Analysis, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada
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anil

Anil Arora

Chief Statistician of Canada, Statistics Canada
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Stuart Beare

Lieutenant-General (retired), Strategic Advisor Public Safety and Defence, Accenture Canada
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Alex Benay

Chief Information Officer of the Government of Canada, Treasury Board Secretariat
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Neil_Bouwer

Neil Bouwer

Assistant Secretary, Horizontal Innovation Review, Treasury Board Secretariat
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Adrian Brown

Adrian Brown

Executive Director, Centre for Public Impact
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Bonnie Butlin

Co-founder, Security Partners’ Forum (SPF)
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Davide Cargnello

Vice President & Chief Research Officer
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Alex Conliffe

Alexandra Conliffe

Director, Policy Innovation Platform, Brookfield Institute for Innovation & Entrepreneurship
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Kathy Conrad

Kathy Conrad

Director, Digital Government, Accenture
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kdarling

Dr. Kate Darling

Research Specialist at the MIT Media Lab and Fellow at the Harvard Berkman Center
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Jeremy Depow

Vice President of Policy and Research for the Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC)
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Christopher Emery

Vice President, Digital Channels, Rogers Communications Inc.
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MFlumianPIc

Maryantonett Flumian

President, Institute on Governance
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house

Andrew House

Principal, The Earnscliffe Strategy Group
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Erin Kelly

President & CEO, Advanced Symbolics Inc.
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Michele Lajeunesse

Vice President, Digital Governance, Institute on Governance
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Victoria Lennox

Victoria Lennox

Co-founder & CEO, Startup Canada
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Rodney MacDonald

Senior Manager, Global Public Policy
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Jaques Paquette

Jacques Paquette

Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Strategic Service & Policy Branch, Employment and Social Development Canada
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Tim Powers

Vice-Chairman, Summa Strategies
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Althia

Althia Raj

Ottawa Bureau Chief, Huffington Post
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Nads pic

Nadine Smith

Global Director, Marketing & Communications, Centre for Public Impact
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brian_topp

Brian Topp

Brian Topp, Fellow at the Public Policy Forum, Partner, KTG Public Affairs
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Facilitator
Catherine Clark

Catherine Clark

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