2016-2017 Dialogue Series

Framing Innovation: Westminster 2.0 in the Digital Age

In an increasingly digital world, the task ahead for Canada’s public institutions is to evolve the Westminster system, both its political and administrative institutions, in a context of increased public expectations for speed, responsiveness and representativeness, and a renewed demand for improved outcomes that preserve and advance the public good.

The Digital Governance Partnership research and engagement theme for 2016-2017 is Framing Innovation: Westminster 2.0 in a Digital Age.  For more information click here.

November 15, 2016 - Mobilizing Capacity in the Digital Age: Tapping Expertise Within, Across, and Outside Government
SummaryAgendaVenueSpeakers

The series complements our annual Digital Governance Forum and is designed to bring together partners, public servants and other stakeholders to help identify key researchable questions, validate frameworks, and contribute to achieving tangible results. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in and contribute to workshops designed to address the key topics of each session and as a result will take away concrete, practical recommendations and strategies.

Fall 2016 Dialogue Series

Framing Innovation: Westminster 2.0 in the Digital Age

Dialogue 1

Westminster 2.0: Mobilizing Capacity in the Digital Age:

Tapping Expertise Within, Across, and Outside Government

 November 15, 2016

 8:30-9:00         Breakfast & Networking

9:00-9:15         Welcome                               

9:15-9:30         Opening Remarks                

9:30-10:30      Session 1: Modernizing Government: Sharing Information, Expertise and

Accountabilities

 Digital culture and technologies challenge both the role of public servants and their traditional place in the policy field. The proliferation of connected devices is generating analysable data at an unprecedented pace, yet governments increasingly do not possess the analytic capacity to make use of the data for policy functions. Outsourced capacities may require reintroduction, and vertical information silos within the public service must be broken down. The sharing of information and expertise between and within departments does not come naturally to government, but must be supported and encouraged. That said, there are legitimate concerns about the extent to which government should be empowered to collect, share and monitor citizens’ data. The debate over the NSA’s bulk data collection demonstrates that citizens are not comfortable with the state having unfettered access to sensitive information. Yet granular data can better inform policymaking, leading to better public outcomes. Where should the line be drawn? In an increasingly chaotic and unpredictable landscape, there is also an understandable inclination to minimize risks and avoid making unsafe decisions, yet the public service cannot modernize without being prepared to take risks and chances. Governments may need to reconsider how they think about risk, and establish a new understanding with citizens about what is an acceptable risk for the public sector to take.

 Moderator:     Kent Aitken, Prime Minister of Canada Fellow, Public Policy Forum

 Discussants: 

  • Justin Longo, Cisco Systems Research Chair in Big Data and Open Government Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina
  • Ryan Androsoff, Senior Advisor, Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada
  • Amanda Clarke, Assistant Professor, School of Public Policy & Administration, Carleton University
  • Evert Lindquist, Professor, School of Public Administration, University of Victoria

 Questions: 

  • How are the roles of public servants being challenged by the rise of digital culture and technologies?
  • How can governments best re-integrate outsourced capacities like data and policy analysis? Should they be re-integrated?
  • How can we encourage and support the sharing of information and expertise between and within departments?
  • How can we balance the public policy benefits of big data with public concerns over privacy? Where should the line be drawn between public and private data?
  • How can departments begin to share data and information without compromising security safeguards?
  • How can government best distinguish between acceptable and unacceptable risks?
  • Has the risk landscape changed fundamentally for government in the last ten years?
  • What steps can be taken to combat a culture of risk aversion in the public service, and encourage a willingness to experiment?

 10:30               Break             

10:45               Workshop Session:  Supporting Innovation in a Digital World

Workshop Topic:       Growing Global Companies and Accelerating

Clean Growth

How can the Government of Canada facilitate better sharing of information, expertise and programming among the departments and levels of government? What steps can be taken to promote experimentation and acceptable levels of risk-taking to promote innovation? How can public servants better leverage the expertise of researchers and entrepreneurs, for example, from outside government?  These questions may be discussed in the context of Canada’s Innovation Agenda. For instance, core to that agenda is the desire to develop and scale innovative start-ups into the next generation of job-creating global companies, particularly in emerging economic frontiers such as digital technology and clean energy. Creating the conditions for accelerated business growth, however, will require unprecedented collaboration across departments and levels of government, including those responsible for disparate functions ranging from economic development and business financing to international trade and environmental policy.

 Facilitator:      Anthony Williams, DEEP Centre

 11:30               Quick plenary ‘report-outs’ from each table (8-10 tables).

 Objectives 

  • Identification of researchable themes
  • Recommendations and takeaways for facilitating the sharing of information and expertise across departments and levels of government
  • Recommendations and takeaways for promoting experimentation and for leveraging expertise from outside government

12:00-1:00       Lunch

1:00-2:00         Session 2: Managing and Mobilizing Talent and Resources in the Digital Era

 New skills and competencies, as well as new ways to source and manage these competencies, are increasingly required in our public institutions to address the changes being wrought in the governance landscape by digital culture. As innovation cycles grow shorter, governments are attempting to re-integrate previously outsourced capacities like data and policy analysis. The ability to recognize and interrogate the assumptions inherent in the government’s tool kit will need to be more comprehensive and pervasive. This raises questions concerning how public institutions go about equipping themselves to confront the needs of the digital era, from the need for technical skills in data analytics to ‘softer skills’ in collaboration and partnership building, all in a fast changing environment where long term training and development must be balanced against the need to move quickly while controlling costs. The way the public service acquires, trains, and retains talent may require reconsideration, as will the contracting of services to outside providers in the private sector and civil society. Instances will arise where an outside actor may provide a public service function more efficiently and effectively than government. In such cases, what should the relationship between the state and the outside actor look like?

Moderator:     Justin Longo, Cisco Systems Research Chair in Big Data and Open Government Johnson Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina

Discussants:

  • Corinne Charette, Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
  • Jonathan Craft, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and School of Public Policy & Governance, University of Toronto
  • Evert Lindquist, Professor, School of Public Administration, University of Victoria
  • Amanda Clarke, Assistant Professor, School of Public Policy & Administration, Carleton University
  • Maryantonett Flumian, President, Institute on Governance

Questions: 

  • What new skills and competencies do public servants and institutions require in the digital age?
  • Are public service hiring practices too rigid? How can they be reformed to facilitate the acquisition of relevant talent?
  • How can governments best utilize outside expertise (NGOs, the private sector)? How should such partnerships be governed?
  • Should external service providers be viewed by government as clients, partners, or retail providers? What does this mean?
  • What new analytic, engagement, and leadership skills are required by governments to mobilize talent in the digital age?
  • What are the implications of greater permeability between the public and private sectors?
  • What steps can government take to develop and train internal resources to address issues in a digital context?

2:00-2:15         Break             

2:15-3:15         Workshop Session: Capacity Building in a Digital Context

Workshop Topic:       Building World-Class Clusters in Canada

What role can digital technologies play in helping new networks of expertise emerge, and how can government support this emergence? What new skills and competencies will public servants need to excel in brokering new partnerships and leverage them? What kind of governance models will be needed to ensure long-term success? These questions may be discussed in the context of the Government of Canada’s focus on developing world-leading clusters in areas where Canada has the potential to be, or is already known as, a hotbed of innovation—clusters that will be the destination of choice for ideas, talent and capital. Among other things, this means fostering high-performing partnerships between research institutions, businesses, investors, and all levels of government.

Facilitator:      Anthony Williams, DEEP Centre

3:15-3:45         Plenary ‘report-outs’ from each table (8-10 tables).

Objectives 

  • Identification of researchable themes
  • Recommendations and takeaways for acquiring the skills and competencies needed to broker partnerships
  • Recommendations and takeaways for the role of digital technologies and new governance models in promoting world-class clusters

3:45-4:00         Closing: Final Thoughts, Next Steps, Thank You

Thanks

 Institute on Governance

Digital Governance Partnership

                                         

The Institute on Governance

Second Floor

60 George Street (Byward Market)

Ottawa, Ontario

Facilitator

anthony

Anthony D. Williams

Co-founder and President

Centre for Digital Entrepreneurship and Economic Performance

Anthony D. Williams is co-founder and president of the DEEP Centre and an internationally-recognized authority on the digital revolution, innovation and creativity in business and society. He is co-author (with Don Tapscott) of the groundbreaking bestseller Wikinomics and its follow-up Macrowikinomics: New Solutions for a Connected Planet.

Among other current appointments, Anthony is an expert advisor to the Markle Foundation’s Initiative for America’s Economic Future, a senior fellow with the Lisbon Council in Brussels and the Institute on Governance in Ottawa, and chief advisor to Brazil’s Free Education Project, a national strategy to equip 2 million young Brazilians with the skills required for a 21st Century workforce.

Anthony was recently executive editor for the Global Solutions Network at the Martin Prosperity Institute, a committee member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Science for the EPA’s Future, a visiting fellow with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto and Program Chair for the 18th World Congress on Information Technology in Montreal. His work on technology and innovation has been featured in publications such as the Huffington Post, Harvard Business Review and the Globe and Mail.

Speakers
longo-justin

Justin Longo

Justin Longo (@whitehallpolicy) is the Cisco Systems Research Chair in Digital Governance and an Assistant Professor in the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Regina. He has a PhD in public policy and public administration from the University of Victoria (2013) where he researched the use of enterprise social collaboration platforms inside government policy analysis settings. Following postdoctoral work in open governance at Arizona State University, his current research focuses on the social, organizational, and political implications of advancing technology. From the impact of the “sharing economy” on social and governance arrangements, to the unanticipated consequences of policy analytics, new ways of organizing work, and the evolving relationship between citizens and the state, the profound changes of the digital era provide the foundation for considering the trajectory of our shared future.

Justin Longo (@whitehallpolicy) is the Cisco Systems Research Chair in Digital Governance and an Assistant Professor in the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Regina. He has a PhD in public policy and public administration from the University of Victoria (2013) where he researched the use of enterprise social collaboration platforms inside government policy analysis settings. Following postdoctoral work in open governance at Arizona State University, his current research focuses on the social, organizational, and political implications of advancing technology. From the impact of the “sharing economy” on social and governance arrangements, to the unanticipated consequences of policy analytics, new ways of organizing work, and the evolving relationship between citizens and the state, the profound changes of the digital era provide the foundation for considering the trajectory of our shared future.


evertlindquist

Evert Lindquist

Dr. Evert Lindquist is Professor in the School of Public Administration, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, and Editor of Canadian Public Administration, the Institute of Public Administration of Canada’s flagship journal. He has published on topics relating to public sector reform, governance and decision-making, central agencies and their initiatives, policy capability, think tanks and consultation processes, horizontal management, government-non profit relations, and policy visualization. His most recent publications are: The Global Financial Crisis and its Budget Impacts in OECD Nations: Fiscal Responses and Future Challenges (Edward Elgar, 2015), eds. J. Wanna, E. Lindquist, and J. de Vries; “Visualization Meets Policy Making: Visual Traditions, Policy Complexity, Strategic Investments” in Governance in the Information Era: Theory and Practice of Policy Informatics (Routledge, 2015); and “Deliverology: Lessons and Prospects,Canadian Government Executive (March 2016)). He is principal investigator for a SSHRC partnership development grant with university, non-profit and other partners on ‘Digital Governance: Transforming Government for the Digital Era” (2014-16).


jonathancraft

Jonathan Craft

Jonathan Craft is a jointly appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, and School of Public Policy & Governance at the University of Toronto. He specializes in comparative public policy and administration, policy analysis, and Canadian politics. He is particularly interested in political-administrative relations, policy advice, and executive policy work and advisory arrangements.

Professor Craft is the author of Backrooms and Beyond: Partisan Advisers and the Politics of Policy Work in Canada (University of Toronto Press, 2016), Co-editor of Policy Work in Canada: Professional Practices and Analytical Capacities (University of Toronto Press, 2016) and has published in leading peer-reviewed journals and edited collections. Before joining the University of Toronto, he worked as a public servant for the Government of Canada, and a Legislative Assistant at the Ontario Legislative Assembly.


mflumianpic

Maryantonett Flumian

As the President of the Institute On Governance, Maryantonett Flumian is responsible for the development of the Institute’s vision and strategic direction, project and partnership development, and the fostering of programs to promote public discussion of governance issues.

She is a seasoned senior executive at the Deputy Minister level in the Canadian federal Public Service with more than 20 years of large-scale operational experience in the economic, social and federal/provincial domains. She is internationally recognized for her work as a transformational leader across many complex areas of public policy and administration such as labour markets, firearms, fisheries, and environmental issues. She was the first Deputy Minister of Service Canada. Her current research focuses on leadership, collaboration, governance, and the transformational potential of technology primarily in the area of citizen-centered services. Maryantonett spent the last three years at the University of Ottawa initiating programming for the development of senior public service leaders.

Maryantonett received a Bachelor of Arts and a Master’s Degree in history and completed comprehensive exams towards a PhD in the same subject at the University of Ottawa. She sits on the advisory board of the Harvard Policy Group, John F. Kennedy School of Government, and the advisory group of nGenera’s Government 2.0: Wikinomics, Government and Democracy research program.


amanda-clarke-tn-200x200

Amanda Clarke

Amanda Clarke joined the faculty of the School of Public Policy and Administration in July 2014. Her research explores the intersections of public administration, civic engagement and information technologies. She is particularly interested in the implications of social media and related phenomena, such as crowdsourcing, open data and big data, for governments and civil society.

Amanda is a graduate of Carleton University’s College of the Humanities (Bachelor of Humanities) and the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (MA International Affairs). From 2010-2014, Amanda was a Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Scholar, an Oxford University Press Clarendon Scholar, and a Doctoral Fellow of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

In 2014 Amanda completed a DPhil in Information, Communication and the Social Sciences at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford. Focusing on the governments of Canada and the United Kingdom, and two sector-specific case studies (foreign policy and social security), Amanda’s doctoral project explored the models of government-citizen relations reflected in government’s engagement with the social web, and identified reforms required for public sector bureaucracies to capitalize on social media, big data and open data as new instruments of policy development and service delivery.


ryan

Ryan Androsoff

Ryan Androsoff is an international expert on digital government and a passionate advocate for the use of social media, collaborative technologies, and open data in the public sector. Since 2010 he has served as a Senior Advisor in the Chief Information Officer Branch of the Government of Canada’s Treasury Board Secretariat, where he is currently working on initiatives to improve digital service delivery capacity across the federal government. In 2015 Ryan took a one-year assignment with the OECD in Paris, France where he was involved in a number of digital government projects including reviews in Northern Ireland, Slovakia, and Morocco as well as open data capacity building in the Latin American and MENA regions. His previous work at Treasury Board Secretariat has included leading the development of the first government-wide social media policies, managing the GC2.0 Tools team responsible for the Government of Canada’s internal on-line collaborative platforms (GCpedia and GCconnex), and advising senior management on policy innovation and the use of digital technologies in government.

Ryan’s career has also included serving as an advisor to Canada’s Minister of International Cooperation at the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), and working at the World Bank in Washington, DC on initiatives to promote results- based management in international development. Ryan is a graduate of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts where he earned a Master in Public Policy degree. Ryan also has an Honours degree in Public Affairs and Policy Management from Carleton University in Ottawa. He was born and raised in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.


kent

Kent Aitken

Kent Aitken joined the federal public service in 2009 to work in public policy, but keeps getting pulled towards roles that examine the systems in which policy gets made. He’s spent the last few years working on accountability, transparency, and citizen engagement to redefine the relationship between citizens and their government. Kent contributes to the civil society and public administration communities by organizing events, writing about public service renewal, and working with organizations that bridge the gap between government and citizens. He has just finished his dissertation for a Master of Science in Environmental Economics from the University of London, U.K.

The Prime Ministers of Canada Fellowship was established in 2012 to mark the Public Policy Forum’s 25th anniversary, when all living former Prime Ministers were honoured at theTestimonial Dinner and Awards in Toronto. The Fellowship brings prominent Canadian leaders to the Forum to conduct research and convene dialogues about public policy, democratic institutions and good governance. The Fellowship is supported by funding from our presenting partner, the RBC Foundation.


charette

Senior ADM – Corinne Charette

Corinne Charette was appointed to the position of Senior Assistant Deputy Minister of the Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications (SITT) sector on March 16, 2015. The SITT sector is housed within the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED). Whose mission is to foster a growing, competitive knowledge based economy. In her role as Senior ADM, Ms. Charette supports Canada’s transition to a digital economy by promoting the development and use of world class information and communications technologies. Her oversight responsibilities include managing the radio spectrum including spectrum auctions, licensing and compliance, supporting the security and emergency management of Canada’s telecommunications infrastructure, responsibility for Canada’s online privacy and data protection framework (PIPEDA), and research in wireless communications technologies.

In addition to her responsibilities as Senior ADM, Ms. Charette was also named Chief Digital Officer (CDO) for the Department (effective December 2015). As CDO, she will establish a digital roadmap to drive the adoption of the Business Number across ISED and other government departments, ensuring that the various digital transformation initiatives within the portfolio and OGD’s, are aligned.

Before joining ISED, Ms. Charette was the Chief Information Officer of the Government of Canada, Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), a position she held since May 4, 2009. She came to the TBS from Transat A.T. Inc., where she was Vice-President and Chief Information Officer. She also served as Senior Vice-President, Internet Channel, for the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce and was a Partner with KPMG Consulting, leading their e-Business practice.

Ms. Charette holds a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering from Concordia University and is a professional engineer. In June, 2011, she received an honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from Concordia University.

January 31, 2017 - Transforming Service and Regulation in the Digital Age: Impact & Outcomes
SummaryAgendaSpeakers

The Institute on Governance is bringing together innovators, trailblazers, public policy creators, implementers and key influencers to look at the impact of digital culture and technologies on public institutions.  The dialogue sessions are a complement to the annual Digital Governance Forum.  You will have the opportunity to engage in and contribute to workshops designed to address the key topics of each session and as a result will take away concrete, practical recommendations and strategies.

Why you should attend?

  • To share and learn from one another
  • To build strategic partnerships
  • To hear about best practices from trailblazers and innovators who are making transformational change within their governments and institutions.
  • To network with other influencers from within and outside government

Framing Innovation: Westminster 2.0 in the Digital Age

2016-2017 Digital Governance Dialogue Series

Dialogue 2

Transforming Service and Regulation in the Digital Age:

Impact & Outcomes

January 31, 2017

Adobe Conference Centre , Ottawa

8:30      Breakfast     MC Toby Fyfe , Vice President, Learning Lab, Institute on

                                    Governance

8:45       Welcome     Maryantonett Flumian , President, Institute on Governance

9:00       Opening Remarks:

                                    Rodney MacDonald , Senior Manager , Global Public Policy, Intuit

                                    Lena Trudeau , Head of Canada Public Sector, Amazon Web

Services

9:30       Panel Discussion       Managing and Making Use of Information

We are at the brink of an exciting period of innovation in the way public services are developed and delivered. Governments have traditionally invested billions of dollars in social support systems, sometimes with a tenuous understanding of their actual social impact. For the most part, programs and services have been funded, and their effectiveness measured, on the basis of input or activity based indicators. Now, governments around the world are looking to develop and deliver services through outcome-based metrics; to find evidence that a program is having its desired impact, to identify trade-offs when deciding which programs to fund, and to provide a foundation for evaluation, strategic planning, and good governance. The superabundance of information, digital, mobile, and increasingly open, is posing a challenge to organizations that have traditionally managed it in silos as a reflection of organizational power structures and controls. Changing social patterns of behaviour and attitudes towards information use and sharing demand that we revisit traditional approaches, both within jurisdictions and between them.

Sample questions

  • When measuring for outcomes rather than outputs, how can public servants best determine the right outcomes to seek?
  • What is fundamentally new about the federal government’s new approach to results and delivery?
  • What role has digital culture played in shifting the focus of government from outputs to outcomes?
  • How can outcomes be measured to show that a program has achieved its desired impact?
  • How should government and the public service manage information in the future?
  • What changes to the architecture of government are needed to better manage the flow of information?
  • Should there be a federal department of information management, or should each department manage its own?
  • How can superabundant information help inform decisions and trade-offs around the funding of projects and programs?
  • How can we sort useful information from the trivial, to ensure that spurious correlations don’t mislead policy?

10:30       Break

10:45       Workshop Leveraging Digital Analytics & Facilitating Collaboration

Facilitators   Davide Cargnello , Chief Research Officer, Institute on Governance

                           Anthony Williams , Co-founder & President, Centre for Digital

                            Entrepreneurship and Economic Performance (DEEP Centre)

12:00       Lunch

1:00         Panel Discussion       Regulation and Service Delivery in the Digital Era

New, digitally enabled service delivery models in the private sector have dramatically increased citizen expectations about the quality and delivery of public services, emphasizing lower costs, higher quality, and customization. This raises fundamental questions about equity, social justice, and the public good. How can the state evenly serve all its citizens, and keep pace with comparable developments in the private sector? Regulators are also being challenged to keep pace with the increased speed of technological, social, and economic change. Public good mandates from the industrial era are increasingly unfit for purpose as technology blurs the lines between sectors and areas of economic activity. The regulatory renewal life cycle no longer keeps adequate pace with the speed of economic change. Regulation will increasingly need to be better informed by developments in the policy sector, and vice versa. Governments face a challenge to their rule-making mission, and must seek to sustain their relevance in a new century. Without the state, who will address and safeguard the public good?

Sample questions

  • Are governments making effective use of digital technologies in service delivery?
  • What steps does government need to take to offer comparable digital service to what citizens are receiving in the private sector?
  • Can government make use of private sector digital services for its own ends, rather than building expensive, proprietary systems?
  • Can the regulatory renewal cycle move at the speed of digital?
  • How can regulation be proactive rather than reactive in the face of technological change?
  • Should regulatory mandates be reconsidered in the light of digital change? Are they becoming obsolete?
  • How can regulatory authorities use digital technologies to more effectively monitor their sectors?
  • What new approaches are needed to engaging relevant stakeholders in the regulatory process?
  • How can regulators better engage with the policy sector to inform their mandates?

2:00       Break

2:15        Workshop Building Digital Skills Inside and Outside Government

Facilitators    Davide Cargnello , Chief Research Officer, Institute on Governance

                        Anthony Williams , Co-founder & President, Centre for Digital

                        Entrepreneurship and Economic Performance (DEEP Centre)

3:45       Summation

                        Rodney MacDonald , Senior Manager , Global Public Policy, Intuit

                         Lena Trudeau , Head of Canada Public Sector, Amazon Web Services

4:15        Keynote

4:30       Closing

                          Maryantonett Flumian , President, Institute on Governance

 

Facilitator

anthony

Anthony D. Williams

Co-founder and President

Centre for Digital Entrepreneurship and Economic Performance

Anthony D. Williams is co-founder and president of the DEEP Centre and an internationally-recognized authority on the digital revolution, innovation and creativity in business and society. He is co-author (with Don Tapscott) of the groundbreaking bestseller Wikinomics and its follow-up Macrowikinomics: New Solutions for a Connected Planet.

Among other current appointments, Anthony is an expert advisor to the Markle Foundation’s Initiative for America’s Economic Future, a senior fellow with the Lisbon Council in Brussels and the Institute on Governance in Ottawa, and chief advisor to Brazil’s Free Education Project, a national strategy to equip 2 million young Brazilians with the skills required for a 21st Century workforce.

Anthony was recently executive editor for the Global Solutions Network at the Martin Prosperity Institute, a committee member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Science for the EPA’s Future, a visiting fellow with the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto and Program Chair for the 18th World Congress on Information Technology in Montreal. His work on technology and innovation has been featured in publications such as the Huffington Post, Harvard Business Review and the Globe and Mail.

Speakers
anil-arora

Anil Arora

Anil Arora was appointed Chief Statistician of Canada in September 2016.

Mr. Arora has led significant transformational initiatives throughout his career, with experience and partnerships spanning all three levels of government, the private sector and international organizations, including the UN and the OECD. He has led projects on high-profile policy issues, legislative and regulatory reform, and overseen large national programs.

In 1988, Mr. Arora joined Statistics Canada where he served in several positions, including regional operations, corporate services and the redesign of the dissemination function. In 2000, he became Director of Census Management Office and subsequently the Director General responsible for all aspects of the 2006 Census. In this role, Mr. Arora led the most comprehensive redesign of the Program, including the introduction of an online questionnaire. Following the successful delivery of the 2006 Census he became the Assistant Chief Statistician of Social, Health and Labour Statistics from 2008 to 2010.

In 2009, Mr. Arora received the prestigious APEX Leadership Award in recognition of his exceptional leadership skills and management excellence.

In 2010, Mr. Arora joined Natural Resources Canada as Assistant Deputy Minister of the Minerals and Metals Sector, and in 2013 was appointed Assistant Deputy Minister of Science and Policy Integration. He moved to Health Canada in 2014, becoming Assistant Deputy Minister of Health Products and Food Branch and leading a complex organization overseeing regulation of food, drug and health products for Canada. He also served as chair of the International Coalition of Medicines Regulatory Authorities.

Mr. Arora attended the University of Alberta, where he earned a Bachelor of Science, followed by further education in computing science and management, including a graduate certificate in Advanced Public Sector Management at the University of Ottawa, and the Advanced Leadership Program at the Canada School of Public Service.


remi-masse

Rémi Massé

Rémi Massé is the MP for Avignon-La Mitis-Matane-Matapédia and Vice-Chair of the Liberal Caucus of Quebec. With his colleagues Rodger Cuzner and Terry Duguid, he has led a national review on the quality of services provided to employment insurance claimants since May 2016, and has sat on two standing committees.

Before his political career began, Mr. Massé was the Director General of Cégep de Matane and worked for 16 years as a manager and executive at various Canadian government departments in Ottawa and in other regions.

Mr. Massé is very familiar with the workings of the Government of Canada. Over the years, he has developed strong business ties with several provincial, federal and international government representatives. His network of contacts along with his experience, knowledge and skills have helped carry out several initiatives in his region, attract major investments and create many high-quality jobs.

Mr. Massé completed a bachelor’s degree in French Studies and graduate studies in Linguistics at the University of Sherbrooke.

He and his spouse, Helen, are proud of their family values and are parents to four young boys.


kelly-gillis

Kelly Gillis

Kelly Gillis was appointed Associate Deputy Minister in January 2015. Previously, Kelly served as Senior Assistant Deputy Minister, Spectrum, Information Technologies and Telecommunications (SITT) Sector.

In her role as Senior ADM of SITT, Kelly supported the development and use of world-class information and communications technologies, including management and oversight of Canada’s radio spectrum frequencies, research at the Communications Research Centre, cyber security and Connecting Canadians. Kelly has also held the position of Assistant Deputy Minister, SITT, where she focused on policies that supported Canada’s ICT industry and advanced the digital economy.

From September 2009 to March 2012, Kelly was Industry Canada’s Chief Financial Officer. In this role, she was responsible for providing financial oversight, advice and corporate services. Prior to joining Industry Canada, Kelly was the Assistant Secretary and CFO, Corporate Services Sector, at the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, where she led the creation of the new Corporate Services Sector. Kelly was also the Executive Director and Deputy CFO at the Department of Finance Canada.

Kelly holds a Bachelor of Commerce and Graduate Diploma in Public Accounting from McGill University and is also a qualified chartered accountant.

Kelly is originally from Montréal. She and her husband have three children

 

March 9, 2017 - Democracy, Accountability & Citizenship in the Digital Age

SummaryAgenda

The Institute on Governance is bringing together innovators, trailblazers, public policy creators, implementers and key influencers to look at the impact of digital culture and technologies on public institutions.  The dialogue sessions are a complement to the annual Digital Governance Forum.  You will have the opportunity to engage in and contribute to workshops designed to address the key topics of each session and as a result will take away concrete, practical recommendations and strategies.

Why you should attend?

  • To share and learn from one another
  • To build strategic partnerships
  • To hear about best practices from trailblazers and innovators who are making transformational change within their governments and institutions.
  • To network with other influencers from within and outside government

Framing Innovation: Westminster 2.0 in the Digital Age

2016-2017 Digital Governance Dialogue Series

Dialogue 3

Democracy, Accountability and Citizenship in the Digital Age

TBD

Adobe Conference Centre, Ottawa

 

8:30      Breakfast      MC      Toby Fyfe, Vice President, Learning Lab, Institute on

Governance

8:45      Welcome      Maryantonett Flumian, President, Institute on Governance

9:00      Opening Remarks TBC

                            Rodney MacDonald, Senior Manager, Global Public Policy, Intuit

                            Lena Trudeau, Head of Canada Public Sector, Amazon Web Services

9:30      Panel Discussion      Democracy in the Digital Age: Changes,

                                                       Adaptations, Challenges

The rapid proliferation of digital technologies among citizens and civil society organizations is increasingly providing new ways for citizens to engage with each other and with their governments. This is challenging institutions in ways that directly affect the relationships between government and citizens. New technologies offer the possibility of strengthening citizens’ voice in politics and governance, creating political spaces for new forms of citizen participation in a representative democracy. Democratic political institutions conceived in the eighteenth century, such as parliament, may need to be reinvented to meet the demands of the digital era. Political parties are transforming to reflect the society they serve, and are increasingly data-centric and organizationally fluid. The relationship between the state and citizens is transforming, and the public service is at the heart of the change. This raises fundamental questions; what is the right balance between representation and participation in the digital era? What is the proper role of political parties, parliament, and civil society organizations within the democratic process? How is the digital age transforming democratic governance in Canada?

Sample questions

  • What is digital democracy? What does it look like? How should it operate?
  • What new ways are citizens engaging with each other and with their governments?
  • In the digital era, what challenges do institutions face in defending the public good?
  • How should parliament change to reflect the changing digital landscape? Should it?
  • How have digital technologies affected the interface between public servants and elected officials? Or between public servants and the public?
  • Where should the balance fall between representation and citizen participation in a digital democracy?
  • Is the traditional political party system strengthened or weakened in the digital era?
  • How has digital culture changed the way political parties operate?
  • Is public service neutrality still possible in an era where opinions are amplified, and where conflicts of interest and loyalties are more obvious?
  • How does digital culture amplify scandals, and how are politicians adapting to mitigate and manage scandal?

10:30      Break

10:45      Workshop      Engaging Citizens and Fostering an

                                           Entrepreneurial and Creative Society

Facilitators    Davide Cargnello, Chief Research Officer, Institute on Governance

                             Anthony Williams, Co-founder & President, Centre for Digital

Entrepreneurship and Economic Performance (DEEP Centre)

12:00      Lunch

1:00       Panel Discussion      Accountability in a Networked Era:

                                                      Managing Risks and Expectations

Digital technologies challenge both the anonymity of public servants and their traditional place in the policy field. At the same time, they allow the “multiple truths” that demand recognition in the context of complex issues to surface. Failure to incorporate the views of newly empowered stakeholders in and out of government comes with increasing costs and can often reinforce a defensive reliance on rules-based culture, self-censorship and blind implementation on the part of public servants. A narrow, compliance-based culture may prevent government from taking necessary risks by punishing those public servants who, while developing innovative practices, fail to meet strict accountability criteria. The emergence of horizontal governance initiatives and the proliferation of agents of parliament also complicate the traditional accountability landscape, posing new challenges in the proper rendering of account and management of risk. In this landscape, how can public servants best conceive of their duty to account to the public for their actions?

Sample questions

  • What challenges does digital culture pose to traditional accountability frameworks?
  • Are outcomes hampered by a narrow culture of compliance in the public service?
  • Do strict accountability practices stifle innovation and worthwhile risk-taking?
  • Can the public be convinced that outcomes matter more than strict rules or procedures?
  • How should account be rendered in horizontal governance initiatives?
  • Are individual public servants accountable to the public as well as their superiors?
  • Has the proliferation of agents of parliament helped or hindered the cause of greater accountability?
  • How has the 24-hour news cycle’s focus on scandal influenced the accountability regime, how does the media influence processes and agenda, and has it further blurred the boundary between personal and public life?
  • What role could digital technologies play in enhancing accountability regimes?
  • Can public service anonymity be retained? Has ‘the bargain’ been broken? What does the new bargain look like?

2:00      Break

2:15      Workshop       Openness and Accountability in a Digital

                                        World – Open Science and Evidence-Based Decision-Making

Facilitators    Davide Cargnello, Chief Research Officer, Institute on Governance

                             Anthony Williams, Co-founder & President, Centre for Digital

Entrepreneurship and Economic Performance (DEEP Centre)

3:45      Keynote TBC

4:00      Closing Remarks

                             Maryantonett Flumian, President, Institute on Governance

                             Rodney MacDonald, Senior Manager, Global Public Policy, Intuit

                             Lena Trudeau, Head of Canada Public Sector, Amazon Web Services

 

 

 

Research Partners

logodiaseries2-iog

Register Now

Thank You

Contributing Sponsor

 


Supporting Sponsor

Contact Us

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Past Reports

Coming soon


Quick Links

Connect With Us